These are the questions asked during the presentation that we didn't have time to answer. Answers will be added over the next week or so.


Q: How can you tell when something is all right to unbundle and something is not good for unbundling?

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Q: Doesn’t unbundling make legal services more like medical services where there is an expectation of responsibility that the patient has and a limit to what a doctor can do? Is this a good way to think of this?

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Q: How do you address the professional responsibility (ethics) intersection between limited scope "LEGAL" services and integrated and traditionally considered "non-legal" services. That is, unbundling does not seem to address the closely related issue of emerging legal services (such as compliance assessment and mitigation). That is, one might be able to unbundle traditionally viewed legal services but get caught with the imputation of the full ethics panalopy (via 1.8). I am interested in how this emerging issue can also be addressed (I see it as fundamentally related to unbundling).

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Q: Is this really new? Haven’t lawyers been doing this for a long time? Is the “new” about this all about the Web/Internet?

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Q: Can a new lawyer (someone just out of law school going solo) handle unbundling? Shouldn’t this only be done by experienced lawyers?

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Q: Legal industry lagging behind = opportunity for younger lawyers (tech savvy) vs. older, more established lawyers/law firms?

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Q: If this is an opportunity for newly graduated attorneys, is there anything law schools can do or should be doing to make their students more prepared for providing unbundled services?

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Q: What do professional malpractice insurers think about unbundling?

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Q: Do you have any data or experience with frustration or dissatisfaction on the part of clients despite the clarification of the limitations of service in the legal services contract? Stated the other way, are there any statistics on the success (from the client's point of view) of the limited legal services interaction?

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Q: What if I don’t know anything about technology - this all looks complicated - are there websites/services that can help me setup a new unbundled legal service?

A: Take a look at www.directlaw.com.





Q: How could law schools teach this? ←- similar question above

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Q: Is this all too “mechanical” and does unbundling lose the human element in law practice?

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Q: Are there examples of law re-bundling with discrete services from other professions, for example, family lawyers offering services bundled along with psychological or social services?

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Q: Has virtual practice allowed clients from your entire state to approach you--both urban and rural areas? What happens when individual counties have their own court forms?

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Q: Are there any liability issues if you provide a draft document to a client, who then modifies it before using it? Or do you address this in your agreement?

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Q: In what ways can those providing these services differentiate unbundled services from LegalZoom type services?...

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Q: Do you find that clients are more in need of information regarding what they need to do with their computer generated documents and less guidance in answering the questions used to create the document, giving your service more value than a Legal Zoom type arrangement?

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Q: Are big law firms applying this or thinking about this? Do you think this model can be applied to big law firms?

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Q: I would like to know how are security issues managed such as verification of identification of clients?

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Q: One of the challenges of conventional law school classes is one to many, rather than one-to-one instruction. John has been working on computer aided legal instruction for years, but does this change in the nature of practice change the nature? For example, we are not clear on systems as opposed to cases. Any ideas?

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Q: Is there a difference between limited legal services and unbundling that is meaningful?

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